Taste and flavour

The terms taste and flavour are often used interchangeably, but they do mean different things: taste is a basic sensation (salty, sweet, bitter, sour, savoury), whereas flavour is a complex perception. Taste seems to have evolved for specific biological purposes and serves vital functions. Taste is like the gatekeeper governing what to go ahead and

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Spherification

One of the iconic modernist techniques is spherification. As an industrial technique it has been around a long time (circa 1973), but in a basic way. It was Ferran Adria who first realized its culinary potential when, in 2001, he saw it being used to make small pearl-like gels for a mexican sauce at an

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Hard-steamed egg

To me, the most challenging thing about a hard-boiled egg is not cooking it, but smoothly peeling it. While there are many ways to approach this challenge, I recommend not to boil the egg, but to steam it.  Steam for 14 minutes, then transfer to an ice-water bath (at least 50:50) for 15 minutes (Kamozawa

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The 6xC egg

I was going to write something about the remarkable and reproducible changes that occur in eggs when they are cooked to a precise temperature. This gives rise to the concept of the 6x°C egg, which this blog is named after. But, in this video demonstration, David Arnold explains it much more clearly than I possibly could.

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Fluid gels

I haven’t said much about modernist cooking so far have I? I’ll add a musing later, but in the meantime here’s a concept in the modernist spirit: The ‘fluid gel’ (thixotropic for the scientific-minded). A fluid gel is something that is a gel when sitting quietly, but that transforms into a liquid when sheared by

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